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Genre Equality’s Jan 2021 round-up: The Expanse, Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, First and Last Men & more

Posted 5 months ago Written by SINGAPORE COMMUNITY RADIO

The duo behind Genre Equality puts out a monthly review of the best and worst each month — whether if it’s a new series on Netflix to binge, a film to catch in cinemas (if you use TraceTogether, that is), or a book to simply plug out from the outside noise.

While you can listen in to their latest episode for a full breakdown of their verdicts, scroll down to dig into what they’ve loved (and disliked) from the first month of 2021.

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The Expanse

Season 5

TV/ Amazon Studios
Where to watch: Prime Video

This continues to be the best sci-fi show on air. Season 5’s gamble of splitting up the Rocinante crew to explore the nature of family, survival and the politics of radicalization pays off with richly layered stories.


Star Trek: Discovery

Season 3

TV/ Secret Hideout
Where to watch: Netflix

To a superfan like Hidzir, Star Trek is religion, and Discovery is blasphemy. In season 3, Discovery further abandons Trek’s thoughtful explorations of culture, faith, race, science and diplomacy in favour of dumb action.


Carmen Sandiego

Season 4

TV/ WildBrain Studios
Where to watch: Netflix

The fourth and final season cements Carmen Sandiego as one of the best kids cartoons Netflix has ever made. This educational espionage caper remains stylish and enormously fun till the end.


His Dark Materials

Season 2

TV/ Bad Wolf/New Line
Where to watch: HBO Go

While managing to be a slight improvement on the wonder and spectacle of season 1, this HBO adaptation of Philip Pullman’s beloved fantasy novels remains frustratingly imperfect and devoid of excitement in season 2.


Last and First Men

Film/ Zik Zak Filmworks
Where to watch: Vimeo via Anticipate Pictures (link)

The last project of late Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson is an experimental and immersive sci-fi documentary about the survivors of an advanced society two billion years in the future. It is profoundly haunting, poignant, beautiful, and ethereal.


Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

Part 4

TV/ Warner Bros. Television
Where to watch: Netflix

The final season of Sabrina is bolstered by familiar strengths (it’s queer, horny and Satanic af) and hindered by familiar weaknesses (messy stories, too many characters pulled in too many directions). In the end, this show remains a mixed bag of untapped potential.


Doctor Who: “Revolution of the Daleks”

TV/ BBC Studios
Where to watch: BBC/Prime Video (requires VPN)

Doctor Who’s New Year special is a contemplative endeavour focusing on why the Doctor is always the centre of the series’ universe — and if her companions should break free of her orbit. A good, if inessential, episode that clears the slate for Doctor Who’s upcoming season.


We Can Be Heroes

Film/ Double R Productions
Where to watch: Netflix

Robert Rodriguez’s loose sequel to The Adventures Of Sharkboy And Lavagirl has its lo-fi, campy charms. But it’s ultimately too insipid and uninspired to enjoy.


The Stand

TV/ Vertigo/CBS/Mosaic
Where to watch: CBS All Access (requires VPN)

The latest miniseries adaptation of Stephen King’s iconic pandemic/supernatural novel is bolstered by great performances and production values. Unfortunately, it’s also dragged down by horrendous pacing, hollow exposition, and muddled stories.


The Promised Neverland

Film/ Shueisha Inc.
Where to watch: Golden Village

This live-action adaptation of the popular manga and anime is faithful to a fault. Sadly, condensing 12 episodes of story and character development into one movie isn’t the wisest of moves.


Equinox

Season 1

TV/ Apple Tree Productions
Where to watch: Netflix

Based on an acclaimed podcast, this Danish series uses Scandanavian folklore to propel a captivating mystery and investigate philosophical conundrums such as determinism vs. free will, alongside the toll of grief and loss. A decent binge that is impeded by a rushed climax and occasional leaps in plot logic.


Shadow in the Cloud

Film/ Automatik/Four Knights
Where to watch: Local cinemas

Centering on a WWII pilot (played by Chloe Grace Moretz) who fights off gremlins on her B-17 Flying Fortress, this indie sci-fi could have been a fun adventure. Instead, it devolves into something excruciatingly stupid.


Outside the Wire

Film/ Automatik/42 Films
Where to watch: Netflix

This Training Day-meets-Terminator hybrid is a flat, dour, snoozefest.


We Only Find Them When They’re Dead

Comics/ Boom! Studios
Where to buy: Local bookstores

Al Ewing’s gorgeous, cosmic series is one of the best new indie comic books out right now. Set in a future when Earth’s resources have depleted, this tale of poor miners who strip the corpses of giant space gods to survive is fun and propulsive.


Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin

Comics/ IDW Publishing
Where to buy: Local bookstores

Kevin Eastman’s climax to the TMNT series jumps to a post-apocalyptic future where only one Ninja Turtle has survived (his identity is a mystery). Seeking vengeance for his murdered brothers, The Last Ronin returns TMNT to its dark and gritty comic book roots for its heartbreaking final story.