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Genre Equality’s Dec 2020 round-up: The Mandalorian, Soul, Wonder Woman 1984 & more

Posted 9 months ago Written by SINGAPORE COMMUNITY RADIO
Genre Equality podcast Singapore Community Radio
Photo credit Disney

The duo behind Genre Equality puts out a monthly review of the best and worst each month — whether if it’s a new series on Netflix to binge, a film to catch in cinemas (if you use TraceTogether, that is), or a book to simply plug out from the outside noise.

While you can listen in to their latest episode for a full breakdown of their verdicts, scroll down to dig into what they’ve loved (and disliked) from 2020’s last gasp.



The Mandalorian

Season 2

TV/ Disney
Where to watch: Disney+ (coming to Singapore Feb 23)

Season 2 of The Mandalorian was an exciting, emotional triumph! Economical episodic storytelling made it a breeze for casuals, while us hardcores freaked out over how the show organically weaved elements of Dave Filoni’s animated series, the expanded universe books, and video games into its plot.


Wonder Woman 1984

Film/ Warner Bros. Pictures
Where to watch: Local cinemas

While we appreciated the film’s powerful message and brightly optimistic tone, they barely redeemed this overlong sequel’s many flaws — namely its nonsensical internal logic, horrendous pacing, and cheaply earned character beats.

Soul

Film/ Disney/Pixar
Where to watch: Local cinemas

Pixar hits it out of the park again! Featuring the studio’s first Black protagonist, this poignant exploration of jazz music and the afterlife tackles weighty existential questions about mortality and the meaning of life, while still offering lots of broad comedy for kids.


Wolfwalkers

Film/ Cartoon Saloon
Where to watch: Apple TV+

‌Easily the most dazzling animated film of 2020. This underseen gem from Ireland’s Cartoon Saloon impressed us with its intricate and lush hand-drawn visuals alongside its potent themes of empowerment, anti-colonialism, and environmentalism — which reminded us a lot of Studio Ghibli’s canon.


Big Mouth

Season 4

TV/ Titmouse, Inc.
Where to watch: Netflix

From Missy’s identity crisis as a biracial girl (which elegantly leads to Jenny Slate being recast with Ayo Edeberi) to episodes hilariously tackling gender transition therapy, handjobs and tampons – season 4 of Big Mouth continues to mix obscene humour with genuine insight into the confusion of adolescence.


Hilda

Season 2

TV/ Silvergate Media/Mercury Filmworks
Where to watch: Netflix

Season 2 of Hilda remains one of the most charming, wondrous and magical children’s animated shows on Netflix. Its blend of Nordic folklore adventure and warm family dynamics between the free-spirited Hilda and her worried mom makes this one of our favourites.


The Midnight Sky

Film/ Smokehouse Pictures
Where to watch: Netflix

George Clooney’s bleak post-apocalyptic thriller tries to evoke the melancholy, thoughtfulness, and introspection of films like Gravity or Ad Astra. Unfortunately, it lacks the dramatic heft to pull it off. A worthwhile effort that’s watchable but ultimately forgettable.


Archenemy

Film/ SpectreVision
Where to watch: Amazon (VPN required)

This isn’t the best entry to the “grimdark deconstruction of superheroes” trend, but its raw energy, colourful palette, and Joe Manganiello’s lead performance makes this a fun if middling action-adventure.


The Walking Dead: World Beyond

TV/ AMC
Where to watch: Amazon Prime

The Wa‌lking Dead franchise continues to milk its undead premise for all its worth with a 3rd spinoff. World Beyond focuses on the kids who grew up during the zombie apocalypse, but it fails to add anything interesting to the franchise while continuing to bore us with contrived cliches.


Alice in Borderland

TV/ Robot Communications Inc.
Where to watch: Netflix

Finally, anime to live-action that works! ‌While it still pales in comparison to its source material, Alice in Borderland manages to engage with breakneck pacing, exciting survival challenges, and striking imagery of an empty Tokyo.


Detention

TV/ Outland Film Production
Where to watch: Netflix

This Taiwanese supernatural horror movie is a failure on nearly every level. It fails to use its “White Terror” period setting to craft any meaningful allegory, it fails to develop investment in character and, worst of all, it fails to be scary.


Monster Hunter

Film/Sony Pictures
Where to watch: Local cinemas

The king crappy video game adaptations, Paul W.S. Anderson, returns for another crappy video game adaptation. Due to a racist controversy over a distasteful joke, Monster Hunter was banned in China, but that’s the least of the film’s multitude of problems.


Piranesi

Susanna Clarke

Book/Bloomsbury Publishing
Where to buy: BooksActually, Littered with Books

After 16 years, Susanna Clarke’s long-awaited sophomore novel proves that she remains one of the best fantasy authors living today. Though this isn’t the 800-page behemoth of her debut, this slim new story is just as weighty. Piranesi is a complex, challenging, and transcendent puzzle box of a novel that leads readers to profound rewards.