Hauste 10 Tracks Singapore Community Radio
Photo credit Junior Lim

Patterns, the new album by Hauste, strikes the tough balance between instrumental prowess and melodic charm.

While the band’s dexterity remains on full display, the three-piece are keen to step out of indulgence to allow hooks and textures to shine. Watch their recent Baybeats performance below for a taste.

It’s no wonder that for 10 Tracks, the band — comprising of guitarist Daniel Lim, bassist Bennett Bay, and drummer Ian Tan — handed in a remarkable selection of catchy indie pop, club music, post-rock, and old-fashioned screamo.

Where most instrumental rock bands rein in on their comfort zones, Hauste remains wholly inviting and engaging to the outside world.

Listen to our conversation with the band below and pore through their 10 picks.



Mura Masa – ‘Lotus Eater’

Daniel Lim (guitarist): ‘Lotus Eater’ encapsulates this simple and effective form of arrangement that is really inspiring.


CHON – ‘No Signal’

Daniel: [This song] showcases the perfect balance between technicality and musicality. It’s complex yet it is effective in conveying the musician’s intention of invoking a specific mood.


Disclosure – ‘Where Angels Fear to Tread’

Daniel: This took me by surprise. I never would’ve expected this song to change the way I perceive music. The fact that it was a remix reinforces how malleable music can be.


Feed Me Jack – ‘Knight Fork’

Ian Tan (drummer): Feed Me Jack breaks the “math rock” mould by infusing different styles to form something so tastefully raw and unique.


GoGo Penguin – ‘Kamaloka’

Ian: The drummer creates such texture in his beats — [it’s a] balance of intricate drum n’ bassy playing that still feels light and delicate. The texture and mood lie in the subtleties.


Still Woozy – ‘Goody Bag’

Ian: [It’s] just straight up groovy. You can’t help but bob your head with a stank face on. He encapsulates an infectious funk vibe mixed with a modern dreamlike sound for a whole new experience.


Explosions In The Sky – ‘The Only Moment We Were Alone’

Bennett Bay (bassist): My go-to song when I’m feeling down and need a pick me up, and when I want to analyze a really good song. It’s a long song that runs about 11mins but it doesn’t feel boring or overly complex, and instead feels therapeutic.


Floral – ‘This Year’

Bennett: [It’s] your quintessential punk-ish math-rock song. The density they are able to create — despite being a two-man band — always catches me by surprise and always reminds me of the importance of dynamics in instrumental songs.


Suis La Lune – ‘Better Parts’

Bennett: [It’s] twinkly and light yet heavy and raw at the same time. They’re somehow able to weave the interlocking nature of math-rock-like guitar lines with gritty and emotional vocals, while at the same time making sure that it does not sound too harsh. While the song isn’t instrumental it is a good reminder as well that the voice enhances the sonic capacity of a band as instruments do.


Elephant Gym – ‘Finger’

In the podcast, the band explains that their early exposure to math rock was through a live set by Sphaeras.

Bennett: After that gig, we were all searching for math rock bands to listen to as well. I found Elephant Gym, and I was like “Dan, listen to this!”. We thought, “Okay, yeah, let’s do a band that’s kind of like this.”


Hauste’s Patterns will be available on streaming platforms on October 23rd. The album is now available on CD, cassette tape and digital download on Bandcamp.

10 Tracks Fzpz Singapore Community Radio
Photo credit Fzpz

If you’ve paid attention to the Singaporean beat underground over the past few years, the name Fzpz would be familiar — even if you still struggle to pronounce his name (phonetically, it’s pretty straightforward: eff-zee-pee-zee).

The producer, real name Jarren Lim, has dutifully put out releases over the past few years — however, you’d find most activity on his modest Soundcloud page than anywhere else.

2018 was a significant milestone for him, as he teamed up with electronic music label Darker Than Wax for his EP Hidden Personas, which saw him delve deeper into his hip-hop roots. 2019 was a year in which Lim quietly dropped individual tracks sporadically, along with a “name-your-price” release on Bandcamp titled fourfour, a nod to the EP’s pervasive direction towards classic house music.

In 2020, Fzpz has taken the greater leap to release his debut album, titled Death Signs. Inspired by slow-burning R&B jams from nocturnal radio playlists, rather than the boom bap sound he’s made his name with, Death Signs is an accomplished piece of work that displays Fzpz’s versatility in full force.

On this episode of 10 Tracks, we spoke to him about putting the album together, its impressive list of collaborators, and the songs on his playlist that might have influenced his current sonic trajectory.

Listen to the podcast below and check out what he has to say about each track.

Fzpz – ‘Love and Resent’

Fzpz: This was the most personal work I’ve done to date until Death Signs. Heavily influenced by R&B elements from the late 80s and stealing a cheeky bass lick from Mike Porcaro, Toto’s bassist — I tried exploring chord qualities and progression that could steer the song into a brighter mood as it progressed.

Oftrt – ‘Takeout’

I’ve been listening to tons of local music for the past year and Oftrt is one of the latest producers I’ve been rinsing. Oftrt challenges the soundscapes time and time again in his tracks.

The first time I watched him live was at Intriguant’s Uploading event and he is, by far, my favourite local producer to date for the past year. He takes dub to the next level in this track, ‘Takeout’.

Tim De Cotta – ‘Lying Eyes’

His latest single, ‘Lying Eyes’, has got me in the disco boogie vibe and NAztyKeys totally slays it in the solos for this one. I’ve been a long-time fan of TAJ and L.A.B. , both oozing of Soul and R&B which he is part of. I’m a sucker for the synthesizers and jabbing basslines. I’ll also be doing a remix of it soon!

.gif – ‘LET’S GO’

Probably the most unique sounding duo of Singapore, in my opinion. They’re taking the electronic genre with stride and I loved every moment of HAIL NOTHING. Their live presence is a must-catch, coupled with Weish’s mesmerizing vocal looping and Din’s abstract tones.

‘LET’S GO’ is also accompanied by a music video which I adore, directed by VadBibes. He directed the MV of the remix I did for Charlie Lim’s ‘Better Dead Than A Damsel‘.

YRFN, Khally – ‘Tek It Slo’

Part of Allure Records, all tracks from the label are bangers. These guys make me reinstate my faith in the next generation’s drive for Singapore’s music. Most, if not all, tracks are produced by Danish, and this one’s modern take on baile funk was refreshing. I’ve been listening to a ton from these guys and I’ve got to say Khally is one to look out for.

Gema – ‘Tek It Slo (feat. MickeyLEANO)’

Sensual cuts from Jema. A sequel of his first album, Sextape II keeps up with time with Jema’s hush storytelling. I’ve always been a fan of his eclectic take on electronic music.

I played a little guitar in the intro track of the album as well. It was so raw when I doodled and he just took it. That’s what I vibe with when collaborating — everything going right, and not overthinking things.

Fauxe – ‘To the Moon’

Fauxe was the very first beatmaker I came across in 2013-2014 who was extremely proactive in pushing the beat scene.

He dug me up from the Bandcamp days and was very much like an elder brother to me. His latest endeavour, Altruism, celebrates collaboration and the live ensemble aspect of his music. This one, in particular, is my favourite of the album.

Flying Lotus – ‘Coronus, The Terminator’

Been listening to You’re Dead! a ton recently. I really can’t believe it’s been 5 years. My friend Go Yama ended off his 365 project with ‘Never Catch Me’ — a project where he records a short clip of music-making, guitar shredding, and the likes.

Needless to say, Flylo has been such an inspiration to me and to all beatmakers from all styles I’m sure. The entire Low End Theory and Brainfeeder scene has been such an influence in my music as well.

Intriguant – ‘Turn (feat. Charlie Lim)’

Recluse is probably my favourite album so far from Intriguant. In this one, the well-accompanied arrangements, coupled with Charlie Lim’s strong songwriting and docile instrumentation, are always something I go back to.

He’s got so many great artists on Recluse as well. I’ve also been listening to his latest album Kindred, which is much heavier and just goes to show how versatile he is.

Cravism – ‘white lights’

The epitome of lush jazz and lofi beats presently in Singapore, Cravis is one of the beatmakers I listen to when in my chill mode. I love the changes in particular from this track and the smooth and out of sight licks. I also managed to catch his set with Maya Diegel last year at Uploading as well. Excellent chill beats from the two to unwind to.

10 Tracks Fzpz Singapore Community Radio
Photo credit Fzpz

If you’ve paid attention to the Singaporean beat underground over the past few years, the name Fzpz would be familiar — even if you still struggle to pronounce his name (phonetically, it’s pretty straightforward: eff-zee-pee-zee).

The producer, real name Jarren Lim, has dutifully put out releases over the past few years — however, you’d find most activity on his modest Soundcloud page than anywhere else.

2018 was a significant milestone for him, as he teamed up with electronic music label Darker Than Wax for his EP Hidden Personas, which saw him delve deeper into his hip-hop roots. 2019 was a year in which Lim quietly dropped individual tracks sporadically, along with a “name-your-price” release on Bandcamp titled fourfour, a nod to the EP’s pervasive direction towards classic house music.

In 2020, Fzpz has taken the greater leap to release his debut album, titled Death Signs. Inspired by slow-burning R&B jams from nocturnal radio playlists, rather than the boom bap sound he’s made his name with, Death Signs is an accomplished piece of work that displays Fzpz’s versatility in full force.

On this episode of 10 Tracks, we spoke to him about putting the album together, its impressive list of collaborators, and the songs on his playlist that might have influenced his current sonic trajectory.

Listen to the podcast below and check out what he has to say about each track.



Erkin Koray – ‘Yağmur’

Safuan:It was sometime in 2014. We were at my place trying to figure out how we could do NADA musically to accompany the visual art piece we were exhibiting. This was one of the first tracks I pulled out.

I then played Gonjasufi’s ‘Kobwebz’ and explained to Rizman how we could adopt such a sampling technique and he can just sing over it. It was the start of it all, I guess. After that, we started picking out old songs from Southeast Asia and fleshed out 4-5 songs within weeks.


The Swallows – ‘La Obe’

Rizman: It’s the ‘60s in Singapore, at the height of Pop Yeh-Yeh. These guys were playing songs in Baweanese and this particular one hit the charts in Germany. True story!

The NADA world is built on fabricated history and mythologies. We are like pranksters who are constantly pulling the audience’s legs with our ideas and creations. But the fact that The Swallows actually existed and left their mark globally with their own brand of hedonistic sounds, it’s mind-blowing.


Sir Richard Bishop – ‘Solenzara‘

Safuan: Personally, the musical lens of NADA would not have been possible without the mention of either Richard Bishop, Alan Bishop, or the band they used to be in, Sun City Girls.

Eclectic is one of the most overused and abused terms in music and music journalism these days. Whenever I’m going through periods of self-doubt, I will just go back to any of their works. Through their works, they have also taught me how to appropriate the music of others with respect while pushing the envelope to make it your own.

It’s always a delicate balance, especially when it involves the historical culture and heritage which are not ours, i.e. sampling a Thai song or adopting an Ethiopian musical scale.


Alleycats – ‘Suara Kekasih‘

Rizman: This is a perfect example of what used to be a guilty pleasure but then became a staple to listen to after we started NADA. Once, we were in a dressing room and for some weird reason, a transistor radio was blaring one of the Malay channels.

This song came on, we started singing along and discussing how musically rich the track is. It was one of those moments of realization that cemented the idea for us to rely on our own idiosyncratic thoughts or gut feel for whatever we are doing.


Guess What – ‘Al Khawarizmi‘

Safuan: With NADA, it’s always important to have a specific imagined world in mind whenever we are creating or performing. Guess What is one band I look up to when it comes to this methodology.

This song is from an album of the same name where they paid homage to Muḥammad ibn Mūsā al-Khwārizmī, a Persian polymath from the 8th century who produced influential works in mathematics, astronomy, and geography. Through the album, they painted their own magical world just via music, of what it could have been during Al Khawarizmi’s time.

They did the same thing on an earlier album. This time, it was a musical portrait for Yuri Gagarin, the Russian astronaut who was the first human to journey into outer space.


Dengue Fever – ‘Ethanopium‘

Rizman: Mulatu Astatke and Ethiopian jazz, music from a faraway place, yet it sounds like home. There’s just something about it, especially this version by Dengue Fever, an American band that does Cambodian rock covering an Ethiopian piece. The idea of global mish mashing or cultural clashing is always fascinating. Whenever we run out of ideas, the first thing we go to is “what if we combine ________ with ________”.

Safuan: This song was also featured in a Jim Jarmusch film, Broken Flowers. The deep, dark, and absurd worlds he’s created through his films is another source of inspiration for us.


The Stoned Revivals – ‘Stardust Galaticka‘

Rizman: We are fans and friends of the band so we are probably biased when it comes to this. The 90s were our formative years when it comes to experiencing music — going to gigs, buying demo tapes, the full works of exploring music pre-internet.

Though we only met slightly later, with NADA forming a couple of decades after, it won’t do any justice if we didn’t include a Singapore-made track from back then. And this is something special from such a great album.

Safuan: It’s the least celebrated song which deserves more attention (‘Venus with Braces’ too). The guys made do without their signature jangling guitars, experimented with electronics, and kept it minimal.


Sote – ‘Brass Tacks‘

Safuan: The past year or so, especially when the pandemic started, I grew tired of recreating nostalgic sounds or just the idea of nostalgia in general. I wanted to look ahead instead of immersing myself in the past, now more than ever when the future is so uncertain.

I started thinking about how we can create a NADA world that is undeniably futuristic but still strongly echoes a sense of a cultural past. While searching for points of reference, I came across the works of Sote, one of Iran’s foremost experimental composers and sound artists.

The way he blends Persian music with electronics opened new doors for me. It’s definitely a trajectory we want to pursue right now.


Y-DRA – ‘Koplotronika‘

Safuan: We have always kept our ears close to the sounds coming out from the thriving scene in Yogyakarta. This Y-DRA output by Yennu Ariendra is something I can’t stop listening to the past year.

He managed to twist the happy celebratory sounds of the masses that are dangdut koplo into something dark, brutal, and still danceable (somehow).

Gems like this serve as a constant reminder to us on how malleable music or genres can be. It’s really up to our imagination to where we want to bring it to.


Sharifah Aini – ‘Kudaku Lari‘

Rizman: It’s only fair to end this with a crowd favourite. It’s the only song we’ve actually sampled in this list. ‘Kudaku Lari’ is an ecstatic number that can take you places.

For us, we like to have random conversations which involves concocting unbelievable scenarios where the Malay music world collides with the realms of our other music influences.

When we decided to sample this, we fantasized about a version that can be played at the infamous Studio 54 in New York and how it replaced Donna Summer’s ‘I Feel Love’ as the anthem for the era.

Safuan: Basically, this is how NADA works behind the scenes. Instinctively we just rely on the cultural references we share and grew up with, use them as shorthands to communicate ideas between ourselves, have a good laugh about it, and then we get to work.